PREVIOUS YEAR SOLVED PAPERS - UGC NET Management January 2017

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11. Arrange the following steps of training and development process in the right sequence:
(a) Need analysis
(b) Validation
(c) Evaluation
(d) Implement the program
(e) Instructional design

  • Option : C
  • Explanation : The Five-Step Training and Development Process : Training programs consist of five steps:
    1. The first, or needs analysis step, identifies the specific job performance skills needed, assesses, the prospective trainees’ skills, and develops specific, measurable knowledge and performance objectives based on any deficiencies.
    2. In the second step, instructional design, you decide on, compile and produce the training program content, including workbooks, exercises, and activities.
    3. There may be a third, validation step, in which the bugs are worked out of the training program by presenting it to a small representative audience.
    4. The fourth step is to implement the program, by actually training the targeted employee group.
    5. Fifth is an evaluation step, in which management assesses the program’s successes or failures.
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12. Which one of the following is related to ‘Standard of Personnel’?

  • Option : A
  • Explanation : Job Specification: It is a standard of personnel which designates the qualities required for an acceptable performance. It is a written record of the requirements sought from an individual working for a given job. It refers to a summary of the personal characteristics required for a job. It is a statement of the minimum acceptable human qualities necessary for the proper performance of a job.
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13. If an employee desires to pay more than the minimum required contribution under the Employees’ Provident Fund and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1952, then

  • Option : C
  • Explanation : As per Section 6, the contribution which shall be paid by the employer to the Fund shall be ten percent of the basic wages, dearness allowance and retaining allowance, if any, for the time being payable to each of the employees, whether employed by him directly or by or through a contractor, and the employee’s contribution shall be equal to the contribution payable by the employer in respect of him. It further provides that if any employee so desires, the employee’s contribution may be an amount exceeding ten percent of his basic wages, dearness allowance and retaining allowance, if any, subject to the condition that the employer shall not be under an obligation to pay any contribution over and above his contribution payable under this section.
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14. Under the Employees’ State Insurance Act, 1948, sickness benefit can be paid for which one of the following maximum periods?

  • Option : C
  • Explanation : Sickness benefit: This cash benefit consists of periodic payments to the insured person in case of sickness certified by a duly appointed medical practitioners. The benefit paid in cash is payable at the standard benefit rate, corresponding to his daily average wages.
    The benefit is not payable for any day on which the employee works, remains on leave, holiday or strike, in respect of which he received wages. The maximum duration for availing sickness benefit is 91 days in two consecutive benefit periods. After exhausting this benefit, if an insured person is suffering from tuberculosis, leprosy, mental and malignant diseases or any other long-term specified disease, he is entitled to extend the sickness benefit for a further period of 120 days period if he has been in continuous employment for a period of 2 years or more in a factory or establishment to which this Act applies.
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15. Which one of the following laws is enacted by the Central Government and enforced by the State Governments?

  • Option : C
  • Explanation : Labour laws enacted by the Central Government and enforced by State Governments: Such laws, arranged in order of their respective years of enactment are: The Workmen’s (now employees’) Compensation Act, 1923; The Trade Unions Act, 1926; The Children (Pledging of Labour) Act, 1938; The Employers’ Liability Act, 1938; The Weekly Holidays Act, 1942; The Factories Act, 1948; The Plantations Labour Act, 1951; The Working Journalists and Other Newspapers Employees (Conditions of Service) and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1955; The Employment Exchange (Compulsory Notification of Vacancies) Act, 1959; The Motor transport Workers Act, 1961; The Personal Injuries (Emergency Provisions) Act, 1962; The Personal Injuries (Compensation Insurance) Act, 1963; The Beedi and Cigar Workers (Conditions of Employment) Act, 1966; The Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976; The Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1976; The Unorganized Workers’ Social Security Act, 2008.
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